News

Mars is still an environment

And an environment that should be protected. 

With growing interest of terraforming other planets, like Mars, and these opportunities becoming more realistic for companies worldwide, we still need to think about the implications of reshaping environments that could host human life. According the European Space Agency there may be over 120 million objects orbiting the Earth. This is waste over the course of 60 years. However, it is possible that these estimates are skewed against the rapid growth of rocket technology in the last twenty years. We can therefore expect that the rate at which space debris increases in volume will correlate with advances in technology and ambition to send more materials into space. 

The key issue here is about the infrastructure on Mars and the legislation over how human waste is managed. But it is also about the impact of the human presence; are we ready to take responsibility?

The Story of Seanasol

Seanasol Research is creating the niche for space expansion scientists and plant biologists and offers the gateway to low-gravity farming, because when we all move to Mars, everyone will be a farmer.

By taking on the challenge of terraforming Mars and building greenhouses there, we first need to re-think how we grow plants on Earth. The technology and innovation we create on Earth, for Earth, will be used to sustainably grow our food here as much as it will on other planets. That is why every effort we make to improve the way we globally grow our crops—across big cities and harsh environments—we are one step closer to bringing plants to space. 

Join us as we work with our communities, locally and abroad, and bring application-focused plant science into schools and universities.